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The NBSAP Forum contains an extensive library of best practices related to developing and implementing NBSAPs. Our purpose is to enable countries to share and learn about effective, field-tested techniques and solutions. We work closely with our members to document the problem addressed, for whom, the primary actions, how they achieved results, and the solution they achieved. Search for or submit your best pratice here.

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    Mainstreaming Systematic Conservation Planning Into National Scale Conservation Planning In Turkey

    NBSAPForumBestPractice_DKM_SCP_20170209.pdf

    Systematic Conservation Planning (SCP) is developed in needs of objective and effective evaluation of where to direct conservation efforts, in last 30 years. It is developed trough contribution of many different scientists and conservation experts. There are thousands of publications on SCP and many different conservation prioritization exercises conducted by using SCP. However, adapting SCP procedure into local situation and maintaining stakeholder involvement is critical for mainstreaming SCP and carrying it into the national scale.

    Using An Integrated Environmental-Economic Accounting Framework For Sustainable Management Of A World Heritage Area

    A conceptual framework based on accounting principles of stocks, flows, and investment can be applied to natural capital, social and cultural capital, human capital and financial and physical capitals. Development and application of this framework can help to reveal the environmental, social and economic impacts and interactions of prevailing land use (or other management) practices, and provide a way of assessing the effectiveness of different programmes for achieving desired management objectives.

    Natural Capital Accounting And Parks: A Win-Win?

    In the Netherlands, a coalition of multinational and large Dutch companies is taking steps to make their impact on natural and social capital visible throughout their entire value chain, with the help of civil society organizations. This unique initiative of companies, NGOs and the government teaming-up. Their ambition is formalized in a "Green Deal" signed by IUCN-NL, True Price, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Netherlands and the Dutch government. The Green Deal is linked to the global Natural Capital Protocol.

    Lessons From The Implementation Of The Wealth Accounting And Valuation Of Ecosystem Services (Waves) Project : The Case Of The Southern Palawan, Philippines

    The systematic accounting of a country’s natural wealth and the goods and services the ecosystem offer, provides opportunities to generate information and better understand the natural environment’s contribution to the economy. This on the other hand offer support policies and decision in the pursuit of sustainable development taking into account environmental economic and socio-political dimensions.

    The Significance Of Protecting Natural Capital In Greening The World's Economies

    Whilst the Earth’s diversity of species and habitats must be preserved first and foremost for their intrinsic value, the solution (from a socio-economic perspective) lies in recognizing and valuing nature for the ecological services it provides – upon which societies and economies are built. Nature, or “Natural Capital” – biodiversity, ecosystems and ecosystem services – must be preserved and restored as the foundation of human societies and economies.

    Biodiversity Mainstreaming in Primary Sectors in Mexico-The challenge of bringing together all views

    Historically, Mexico’s natural resources have benefited all the population by bringing essential goods in the form of food, construction materials and traditional medicine among others. But in recent decades, a growing economic activity based on heavy extraction of such resources and a lack of coordination among public policies have caused an increased pressure over the country’s biodiversity.

    Conservation On The High Seas: Mainstreaming Biodiv. Into Intern. Policies And Fishing Practices

    Accidental capture (“bycatch”) of a wide range of non-target species is a significant issue for the fishing industry, and for marine biodiversity. Bycatch has a severe impact on many charismatic marine species such as albatrosses, cetaceans, sharks and sea turtles, which often cross vast distances and can be highly vulnerable to bycatch. Every year longline and trawl fishing fleets kill an estimated 300,000 seabirds, driving some albatross species towards extinction.

    Wildlife-Friendly Ibis RiceTM Of Cambodia’s Northern Plains

    ‘Wildlife-Friendly Ibis RiceTM’ is grown in the paddy fields of Preah Vihear province, on Cambodia’s Northern Plains. The Ibis RiceTM project aims to protect critically endangered birds and mammals, and prevent further loss of their habitat, which is being replaced by large and small-scale agriculture. Small-scale farmers from fifteen villages receive a price premium on their rice, in exchange for implementing conservation agreements. These limit the conversion of wetland areas to rice fields, and ban hunting of rare water birds.

    Synergies Between NBSAPs And REDD+

    In 2012, at its eleventh meeting, the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) adopted decision XI/19, which acknowledges the large potential for synergies between REDD+ activities and the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and its Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The decision urges Parties, other Governments, and relevant organisations to fully implement the relevant provisions and decisions of the CBD and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in a coherent and mutually supportive way.

    Building Capacity With Private Sector-Conservation Skill Share Partnerships

    Earth Skills Network (ESN) is a collaboration between Earthwatch, UNESCO, IUCN & businesses. It connects leaders from the business and conservation sector through mentoring & skill-sharing. Through ESN, Protected Areas (PAs) can access relevant skills within businesses & build constructive dialogue on the need to manage environmental impacts. Through ESN, businesses can identify solutions to pressures on natural resources & nurture sustainable business leadership.