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The NBSAP Forum contains an extensive library of best practices related to developing and implementing NBSAPs. Our purpose is to enable countries to share and learn about effective, field-tested techniques and solutions. We work closely with our members to document the problem addressed, for whom, the primary actions, how they achieved results, and the solution they achieved. Search for or submit your best pratice here.

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    Private Sector Contribution To Protected Areas

    Financial mechanisms allow private sector to participate in conservation of biodiversity through corporate responsibility programs and corporate image positioning and complementing the financial sustainability for Protected Areas Systems. Private sector shows an interest in contributing to the development of programs of corporate social responsibility that focus either on social or environmental fields. However, there is still a need for coordination with the National Authorities for Protected Areas.

    Financing Protected Areas In Mexico: Bringing Together Agendas

    Financing Protected Areas is a challenge all countries are facing. Governments are under constant pressure to deliver benefits for the people, enhance actions for poverty alleviation and promote development. Therefore, in order to increase resources for Protected Areas it is key to bring together conservation and development objectives as well as other international and national key issues. Protected Areas provide all types of ecosystem services that are directly linked to social and economic benefits for society.

    Ecosystem Accounting In Support Of Biodiversity Management

    Biodiversity conservation requires balancing trade-offs between biodiversity protection and economic activities. This applies both to protected areas, where the supply of various ecosystem services (e.g. carbon sequestration, water regulation) is seen as an important co-benefit, and not-protected areas, which also contain important elements of global biodiversity.

    Protected Areas And Sustainable Development In Uganda

    Uganda is a home to a remarkable range of protected areas that support a wide variety of wildlife species. Despite the threats faced by protected areas, the long term future of protected areas in Uganda is now probably brighter than before. Protected Areas in Uganda have a high monetary and non-monetary value in Uganda. The table below shows just a summary of Monetary Value of forest products, Services and management as of 2012. In Uganda wildlife enterprise has been widely promoted and considered a promising strategy for income to the government and poor communities in wildlife areas.

    Making The Case: Ecological Infrastructure For Water Security In South Africa

    Ecological infrastructure refers to naturally functioning ecosystems that deliver valuable services to people. Ecological infrastructure is the nature-based equivalent of built infrastructure and is just as important for providing services and underpinning socio-economic development. It’s not only an under-realised asset for cities and their hinterlands, but also one whose potential could be relatively easily unlocked.

    Leveraging Sectoral Investments For Greening The Agriculture Production System – A Case Of Conservation Mainstreaming

    The ‘solution’ addressed the issue of unsustainable extraction of park’s bio-resources by the local communities resulting in adverse park-people relations. Rather than preventing users to rely on bio-resources for their incomes, the ‘solution’ created alternative livelihood strategies and options that centered on the sustainable use practices and in doing so created a meaningful stake of local communities in managing the Park.

    Comoros' Bold Commitment To Expanding The Protected Area Network Underpin The Sustainable Development Agenda

    UNDP is supporting the government of Comoros to establish an expanded and functional system of protected areas in three of the country’s islands: Grand Comoro, Moheli and Anjouan. All efforts go to creating national capacity to manage a system that both representative of the country’s biodiversity endowment and which has good prospects for a sustainable future. Comoros is a jewel in the Indian Ocean, when it comes to biodiversity, natural beauty and the uniqueness of its cultural expression.

    Promoting Public-Private Partnerships To Optimise Terrestrial Protected Area Management In Mauritius

    The Government of Mauritius through the National Parks and Conservation Service (NPCS) of the Ministry of Agro-industry and Food Security is working with partners in the Government, NGO and private sector to expand protected area coverage and enhance PA management effectiveness under the UNDP-GEF Protected Area Network Expansion Project (the Mauritius PAN Project). One of the key elements of these efforts is the involvement of the private sector in protected area management.

    How ‘Sustainable Sourcing’ Can Support Biodiversity Conservation & Protected Areas: Examples From The Fashion Industry

    Making biodiversity conservation and protected areas relevant to business demands an integrated approach. It must integrate methods for measuring business impact and dependencies on nature, include clear communication on what this means for a business in terms of risk and opportunity, and involve collaboration to identify actions and define approaches that will underpin the business’s contribution to conservation.

    Working With Responsibility To Support Sustainable Solutions To The Freshwater Management

    One of the possibilities for recognizing the interdependence of humans and nature is through values and a framework of ethics. In the case of freshwater in New Zealand, various legal solutions have been proposed to settle Maori interests in water. One solution is the vesting of water as a ‘person’ in law, as in Whanganui and Te Urewera. The proposed sale of a hydroelectric company's state assets triggered a Maori claim to activate recognition of Maori interests in fresh water. The case took the argument that sales cannot proceed until Maori interests are settled.