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Search and create Best Practices, Resources, and Peer Reviews

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The NBSAP Forum contains an extensive library of best practices related to developing and implementing NBSAPs. Our purpose is to enable countries to share and learn about effective, field-tested techniques and solutions. We work closely with our members to document the problem addressed, for whom, the primary actions, how they achieved results, and the solution they achieved. Search for or submit your best pratice here.

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    El Comanejo Del Refugio De Vida Silvestre Montaña De Puca/Fundacion Comunitaria Puca

    BP Comanejo en el RVS Montaña de Puca_Fundación Puca.pdf

    El comanejo en Honduras ha sido definido como un ‘modelo de manejo compartido, basado en un proceso dinámico y sistemático, entre el Estado, gobiernos locales y la sociedad civil organizada’. A partir de este concepto se desprenden 4 elementos claves necesarios de abordar para hacer del comanejo un mecanismo eficiente en la administración de las áreas protegidas del país: garantía de la conservación, uso sostenible, gobernanza y participación comunitaria con equidad de género.

    Building Capacity With Private Sector-Conservation Skill Share Partnerships

    Earth Skills Network (ESN) is a collaboration between Earthwatch, UNESCO, IUCN & businesses. It connects leaders from the business and conservation sector through mentoring & skill-sharing. Through ESN, Protected Areas (PAs) can access relevant skills within businesses & build constructive dialogue on the need to manage environmental impacts. Through ESN, businesses can identify solutions to pressures on natural resources & nurture sustainable business leadership.

    Building Negotiation Skills In Support Of Sustainable Land And Resource Use Solutions In And Around Protected Areas In Africa

    The Mutual Gains Approach (MGA) to negotiation is a process model that is based on experimental findings and hundreds of real-world cases for negotiating better outcomes for each involved party, while protecting relationships and reputation. A central tenet of the model, and the robust theory that underlies it, is that a vast majority of negotiations in the real world involve parties who have more than one goal or concern in mind, and more than one issue that can be addressed in the agreement they reach.

    Creating Markets For Watershed Services In Nyungwe National Park, SW Of Rwanda

    Nyungwe National Park is globally recognized for its conservation value as the largest protected mountain forest block remaining in east and central Africa. It is also a major catchment for the nation of Rwanda, providing most of its water for drinking, manufacturing), and hydro-electricity generation. WCS has been working with the Government of Rwanda to:

    Water Funds For Source Water Protection: Opportunity For African Cities

    The Water Fund is a public-private partnership model where downstream water beneficiaries contribute finances to support upstream landowners and conservation managers to sustain good land management practices that yield higher quantities of better quality of water that’s economical to treat and distribute to the city based users while support upstream conservation and livelihood activities.

    Protected Area Finance: Societal Costs Or Societal Investments?

    The money that countries spend to manage and maintain protected areas should not be considered an “expenditure” but an “investment.” This is not only a semantical issue, but also a conceptual and theoretical one. In general, countries, citizens, press, and ministers of finance praise the investment, but not the expenditure. For instance, in the case of the guards that work for these areas, should those salaries be considered as a general expenditure, or as an investment? If we do not pay for the guards, can we keep a protected area safe?