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The NBSAP Forum contains an extensive library of best practices related to developing and implementing NBSAPs. Our purpose is to enable countries to share and learn about effective, field-tested techniques and solutions. We work closely with our members to document the problem addressed, for whom, the primary actions, how they achieved results, and the solution they achieved. Search for or submit your best pratice here.

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    A Mining Company, NGOs And Cattle Owners Work Together To Establish A Vulture Safe Zone In India

    Catastrophic declines in the Indian populations of three vulture species led to the discovery that they were being poisoned by the veterinary drug diclofenac, which they ingested when feeding on cattle carcasses. Despite a ban by the Indian Government in 2006, illegal use continued to kill vultures.

    La RBTDS Un Espace De Collaboration Transfrontalière

    A la suite aux efforts conjugués de la Mauritanie et du Sénégal, le delta du fleuve Sénégal a été érigé par l’UNESCO le 27 juin 2005 en réserve de biosphère transfrontière (RBT), faisant suite à un long processus de collaboration entre les deux pays et un premier jumelage entre le Parc National des oiseaux du Djoudj au Sénégal et le Parc National du Diawling en Mauritanie (en mai 2000). Ce jumelage fut créé afin de renforcer le réseau Ramsar Est Atlantique et de travailler sur une problématique commune : les plantes envahissantes.

    Ibis Rice: Conserving Critically Endangered Birds And Supporting Local Livelihoods In Protected Areas Through A Certified Sustainable Agriculture PES Scheme In Northern Cambodia

    Ibis Rice is a scheme, active since 2007 in three Protected Areas in Northern Cambodia, whereby communities are incentivized to protect critical habitat through sales of a high-quality agricultural product. Under the scheme, farmers that abide by the rules, including agreed land-use plans and no-hunting laws, are able to sell their rice through the village committee, which is legally mandated to administer the land-use plan.

    Integrating Low Technologies With New Ones In Protected Area Management

    It is a well-known fact that indigenous peoples and/or local communities living in and around natural areas are custodians of traditional and working knowledge of the geography and forests where they live. In Sarawak, Malaysia (northwestern Borneo), engaging indigenous communities is an integral part of management and conservation of forests, including in and around protected areas. At least one non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Sarawak is working with these communities to obtain baseline data for management purposes.

    Thinking Like A Boss! Gambian Women Do A 180 Degree Turn-Around From Poverty To Resilience

    TRY Oyster Women’s Association empowers a highly marginalized and economically vulnerable segment of Gambian society. The Association is an established group of 500 female oyster harvesters, with organized leadership, from 15 villages in the Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. It is creating positive change and economic transformation in local villages. Rather than struggling individually, as they once did, women harvesters are now part of a flourishing and widely recognized local enterprise.

    The Role Of Women In Early REDD+ Implementation: Lessons For Future Generations

    Researchers and practitioners have extensively discussed the potential of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) strategies to help or harm forest-based communities, but less attention has been paid to the gender dimensions of this conservation intervention. Safeguard policies aim to ensure that REDD+ does not harm women, but interventions that do not seek to address gender imbalances at the outset could end up perpetuating them.

    ‘Balancing Marine Conservation And Development - Challenges And Solutions For Large Scale Marine Protected Areas In The Pacific Islands Region’

    Large scale marine protected areas must avoid inequitable costs on developing States. In some contexts, this can be achieved through careful design and complementarity with fisheries management regimes to avoid significant reductions in fisheries revenue or impacts on local community livelihoods and food security, and financial investments to mitigate management costs. In other circumstances, rights based management frameworks can be utilised to share costs through the transferral of fishing effort with minimal impact on revenue.

    Reef Rangers – Youth Empowerment & Marine Conservation

    Established a community-based resource management programme for an isolated fishing community on Kia Island in the Northern Fiji sitting on the Great Sea Reef (GSR) of local, regional and global significance being the third largest reef system in the world. Having perceived the current state of poor management of the marine protected area by the people of Macuata province, Reef Rangers was developed to increase education and awareness on Kia and later to communities beyond.

    What You See Is What You Pay: Profiting From Eco-Tourism In Cambodia

    Through eco-tourism the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), park authorities, business and community partners are protecting globally significant populations of endangered species in northern Cambodia. These enterprises also generate enough revenue for local people to change their behavior to more wildlife friendly ways, while also increasing their wealth. Communities manage eco-lodges and employ their members as service providers like guides.

    Tourism On The Fast Track: Challenges For Sustainability And Development In The World Natural Heritage Site Phong Nha - Ke Bang, Central Vietnam

    Located in Quang Binh Province on Vietnam’s North Central Coast, Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park (PNKB) was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003 for its unique geology and geomorphology. The Park also features a high level of biodiversity. The Park is managed by a National Park Management Board (NPMB). The Board is appointed by the Province which finances park operations and management. 65,000 people live in the 13 rural communities in the buffer zone of PNKB and including around 400 ethnic minority people living within the Park borders.